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For dads

Mental Health for Dad's

Having a new baby is a huge change for everyone in your family. This change impacts on fathers as well as mothers.

It is common for dads to experience low mood and anxiety when they have a new baby. There are some really good dad apps to support you being a new Dad.

If your mood or anxiety starts to affect how you feel for parts of the day rather than fleeting moments, affects your sleep, appetite, or your enjoyment of your new baby. Then you may need some support.

Fathers Perinatal Mental Health Leaflet - On the inside of this leaflet is a questionnaire which can help you identify if you have low mood or anxiety.

There are lots of sources of support from online websites, to local counselling

Websites

NHS Choices

Dad’s Matter

Dad Pad

Father's Reaching Out: a website with resources supporting fathers mental health. 

Pandas Dad: a facebook support group for fathers experiencing mental health difficulties after the birth of their baby.

Discerning Dad Caring Community support for males going through bereavement

Samaritans free call 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org (24 hour response)

Swindon Library service has copies of Daddy Blues: Postnatal Depression and Fatherhood by Mark Williams in stock

Contact your GP

Lift Psychology Groups  self referral or through your GP.

Primary care liaison mental health team, your GP, Health visitor or midwife can refer you.

If you are in crisis (having thoughts of harming yourself) you can access Swindon intensive mental health team, Swindon Intensive Team 01793 836820. This is a 24 hour service

Swindon Health Visiting Service 01793 465050

Other useful websites

Lift the Baby: A safe sleep advice video clip made by NHS, lullaby trust and London Irish rugby team to reduce the number of babies who have died of SIDS, because dads have fallen asleep on the sofa with babies. 

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