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Transition Policy

The Care Act requires Local Authorities to carry out a transition assessment of any young person, young carer, or young person’s carer.

What is meant by transition?

Transition is the period of time during which a young person becomes an adult. If a child has care and support needs it is the responsibility of Children's Services for providing social care support; when they become 18 this responsibility transfers to Adult Social Care.

What does the Care Act say about transition assessments?

The Care Act requires Local Authorities to carry out a transition assessment of any young person, young carer, or young person’s carer if they are likely to have needs for care and support when they become 18. Young people, their parents or carers also have the right to request a transition assessment. If we decide not to go ahead with the assessment we must give written reasons why not and we must provide information and advice about preventing care and support needs from developing in the future.

A young person’s transition needs assessment must include an assessment of:

  • The impact of the needs post 18 for care and support on wellbeing
  • The outcomes the young person wishes to achieve
  • Whether and to what extent the provision of care and support could contribute to the achievement of those outcomes

The assessment must:

  • Involve the young person, their parents/guardians and any other person they would like to be involved
  • Be carried out in a reasonable timescale
  • Consider short term outcomes as well as medium and long term outcomes
  • Support the young person and their family to plan for the future
  • Build on existing arrangements
  • Take place at the right time for the young person
  • Happen early enough to allow for planning
  • Consider how interventions other than care and support could contribute to the young person’s desired outcomes

More information

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